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4882 Notes

Until you’re about the age of twenty, you read everything, and you like it simply because you are reading it. Then between twenty and thirty you pick what you want, and you read the best, you read all the great works. After that you sit and wait for them to be written. But you know, the least known, the least famous writers, they are the better ones.

304 Notes

Five Ways To Be A Better Poptimist

nprmusic:

1. Don’t insist that pop be hip. A good chunk of mainstream music gains inspiration from more cutting-edge stuff — always has. (Remember when The Monkees went psychedelic?) But plenty of it plays by other rules: It could be rooted in Christian contemporary music, emo, or soft rock. That…

142 Notes

gettyimagesarchive:

Picture Post photographer THURSTON HOPKINS is 101 today!

HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

CLICK HERE to read a piece written by our curator Sarah McDonald (@PhotoFramed) for Hopkins’ 100th birthday last year.

CLICK HERE to see more photos from the photojournalist The Guardian called one of the greatest of the 20th century. 

From the top:

Picture Post Photographer Thurston Hopkins in Tonga, 26th December 1953. Hopkins is sitting under a home-made sign reading ‘Picture Post South Seas Office, Tonga’. Picture Post - 6832 - Report From Tonga - pub. 1953 

12th February 1955: A young couple getting to know each other at the Manchester University Student Union Fresher’s Ball.

A parade of lifeguards from the Life-Saving Clubs of Sydney at the Surf Carnival during the Royal tour of Australia and New Zealand, 23rd January 1954. Picture Post - 6832 - Royal Tour:The Empire’s Finest Life Saver - pub. 1954 

June 1956: A busy street in Madrid reflected in a shop window. Original Publication: Picture Post - 8493 - Madrid - unpub.

 

19781 Notes

humansofnewyork:

"You want to photograph me eating chicken?""Yep.""Well, if I let you, I need you to help me deliver a message.""What’s that?""I work at this library. And before that, I was coming here for twenty years. It’s my favorite place in the world. As many people know, the main reading room of this library is supported by seven floors of books, which contain one of the greatest research collections in the world. Recently, the library administration has decided to rip out this collection, send the books to New Jersey, and use the space for a lending library. As part of the consolidation, they are going to close down the Mid-Manhattan Library Branch as well as the Science, Industry, and Business Library. When everything is finished, one of the greatest research libraries in the world will become a glorified internet cafe. Now read that back to me."

humansofnewyork:

"You want to photograph me eating chicken?"
"Yep."
"Well, if I let you, I need you to help me deliver a message."
"What’s that?"
"I work at this library. And before that, I was coming here for twenty years. It’s my favorite place in the world. As many people know, the main reading room of this library is supported by seven floors of books, which contain one of the greatest research collections in the world. Recently, the library administration has decided to rip out this collection, send the books to New Jersey, and use the space for a lending library. As part of the consolidation, they are going to close down the Mid-Manhattan Library Branch as well as the Science, Industry, and Business Library. When everything is finished, one of the greatest research libraries in the world will become a glorified internet cafe. Now read that back to me."

183 Notes

http://kateoplis.tumblr.com/post/76865363800/jordan-davis-had-a-mother-and-a-father-it-did

kateoplis:

Jordan Davis had a mother and a father. It did not save him. Trayvon Martin had a mother and a father. They could not save him. My son has a father and mother. We cannot protect him from our country, which is our aegis and our assailant. We cannot protect our children because racism in…

80 Notes

theavc:

R.I.P. Maggie Estep, spoken-word star of the Gen-X age.

theavc:

R.I.P. Maggie Estep, spoken-word star of the Gen-X age.

46 Notes

Perhaps the greatest revelation provided by “Capa in Color” is not that Robert Capa, best known as a war photographer, shot in color film. It is that he shot in color frequently, honing his technical facility and trying to get the work published in magazines…

115 Notes

icphoto:

Huffington Post reviews our exhibition Capa in Color, which is open January 31 through May 4.

A new exhibit at the International Center of Photography pays tribute to Capa’s uncanny ability to stop history in its tracks — which he often did, in black and white. This time, though, the collection of photographs are in color, bringing a shocking amount of dynamism and life to his already spectacular snapshots. 


All images: © Robert Capa/International Center of Photography/Magnum Photos.

105 Notes

reportagebygettyimages:


It seemed like a simple question: How old are you?
But when Matteo Bastianelli asked people he met in Bosnia and Herzegovina, he could hear the pain in their answers.
“They start to say, ‘I was 15 when the Bosnian war started,’ ” said Mr. Bastianelli, an Italian photographer. “It’s like people are locked in the past.”
Mr. Bastianelli moved to Sarajevo, the capital, in 2009, drawn to stories he had heard on previous visits. He spent the next four years working on “The Bosnian Identity,” a dark project that explores the hidden emotional wounds left by the 1992-95 war that changed the country. He sought to ask what it meant to move on after enduring such ravaging violence.

See more of Matteo Bastianelli’s “Bosnian Identity” project on The New York Times Lens blog.
Caption: Adis Smajic’s false arm; he lost his arm when he stepped on a mine while playing soccer with friends. His father and grandfather were killed in the Bosnian war. Sarajevo, 2010. (Photo by Matteo Bastianelli)

reportagebygettyimages:

It seemed like a simple question: How old are you?

But when Matteo Bastianelli asked people he met in Bosnia and Herzegovina, he could hear the pain in their answers.

“They start to say, ‘I was 15 when the Bosnian war started,’ ” said Mr. Bastianelli, an Italian photographer. “It’s like people are locked in the past.”

Mr. Bastianelli moved to Sarajevo, the capital, in 2009, drawn to stories he had heard on previous visits. He spent the next four years working on “The Bosnian Identity,” a dark project that explores the hidden emotional wounds left by the 1992-95 war that changed the country. He sought to ask what it meant to move on after enduring such ravaging violence.

See more of Matteo Bastianelli’s “Bosnian Identity” project on The New York Times Lens blog.

Caption: Adis Smajic’s false arm; he lost his arm when he stepped on a mine while playing soccer with friends. His father and grandfather were killed in the Bosnian war. Sarajevo, 2010. (Photo by Matteo Bastianelli)

860 Notes

nprmusic:

Pete Seeger's tools were his songs, his voice, his enthusiasm and his musical instruments. A major advocate for the folk-style five-string banjo and one of the most prominent folk music icons of his generation, Seeger was also a political and environmental activist. He died Monday at age 94.
Photo: Wiqan Ang for NPR

nprmusic:

Pete Seeger's tools were his songs, his voice, his enthusiasm and his musical instruments. A major advocate for the folk-style five-string banjo and one of the most prominent folk music icons of his generation, Seeger was also a political and environmental activist. He died Monday at age 94.

Photo: Wiqan Ang for NPR

505 Notes

148 Notes

reportagebygettyimages:

PowerHouse Books will be publishing “Testament,” a collection of photographs and writing by the late photojournalist Chris Hondros, in April of this year. Hondros, an employee of Getty Images, was killed while working in Misurata, Libya, in April 2011. The book covers his work from most of the world’s conflicts since the late 1990s, including Kosovo, Afghanistan, the West Bank, Iraq, Liberia, Egypt and Libya.
From the PowerHouse press release:

Hondros was not just a front-line war photographer, but also a committed observer and witness, and his work humanizes complex world events and brings to light shared human experiences. Evident in his writings, interspersed throughout, Hondros was determined to broaden our understanding of war and its consequences.

Read more on PowerHouse’s Web site.

reportagebygettyimages:

PowerHouse Books will be publishing “Testament,” a collection of photographs and writing by the late photojournalist Chris Hondros, in April of this year. Hondros, an employee of Getty Images, was killed while working in Misurata, Libya, in April 2011. The book covers his work from most of the world’s conflicts since the late 1990s, including Kosovo, Afghanistan, the West Bank, Iraq, Liberia, Egypt and Libya.

From the PowerHouse press release:

Hondros was not just a front-line war photographer, but also a committed observer and witness, and his work humanizes complex world events and brings to light shared human experiences. Evident in his writings, interspersed throughout, Hondros was determined to broaden our understanding of war and its consequences.

Read more on PowerHouse’s Web site.

652 Notes

theatlantic:

When Good People Do Nothing: The Appalling Story of South Carolina’s Prisons

In two months, America will observe the 50th anniversary of one of its most dubious moments. On March 13, 1964, Catherine “Kitty” Genovese was brutally murdered in Queens, New York. What made her case infamous—legendary, even—was that nobody responded to her cries for help. “Please help me, please help me!” she cried, over and over, and at least 38 people in her neighborhood who heard those cries did nothing to help her. They did not call the police. They did not come to comfort her. They did not, they later said, want to get involved. “When good people do nothing” is a timeless moral question, indeed.
One could say the same thing about the citizens of the state of South Carolina, who stand condemned today by one of their own. On Wednesday, in one of the most wrenching opinions you will ever read, a state judge in Columbia ruled that South Carolina prison officials were culpable of pervasive, systemic, unremitting violations of the state’s constitution by abusing and neglecting mentally ill inmates. The judge, Michael Baxley, a decorated former legislator, called it the “most troubling” case he ever had seen and I cannot disagree. Read the ruling. It’s heartbreaking.
The evidence is now sadly familiar to anyone who follows these cases: South Carolina today mistreats these ill people without any evident traces of remorse.  Even though there are few disputed material issues of law or fact in the case, even though the judge implored the state to take responsibility for its conduct, South Carolina declared before the sun had set Wednesday that it would appeal the ruling—and thus likely doom the inmates to years more abuse and neglect. That’s not just “deliberate indifference,” the applicable legal standard in these prison abuse cases. That is immoral.
Read more. [Image: SCDC/Trial Exhibit]

theatlantic:

When Good People Do Nothing: The Appalling Story of South Carolina’s Prisons

In two months, America will observe the 50th anniversary of one of its most dubious moments. On March 13, 1964, Catherine “Kitty” Genovese was brutally murdered in Queens, New York. What made her case infamouslegendary, even—was that nobody responded to her cries for help. “Please help me, please help me!” she cried, over and over, and at least 38 people in her neighborhood who heard those cries did nothing to help her. They did not call the police. They did not come to comfort her. They did not, they later said, want to get involved. “When good people do nothing” is a timeless moral question, indeed.

One could say the same thing about the citizens of the state of South Carolina, who stand condemned today by one of their own. On Wednesday, in one of the most wrenching opinions you will ever read, a state judge in Columbia ruled that South Carolina prison officials were culpable of pervasive, systemic, unremitting violations of the state’s constitution by abusing and neglecting mentally ill inmates. The judge, Michael Baxley, a decorated former legislator, called it the “most troubling” case he ever had seen and I cannot disagree. Read the ruling. It’s heartbreaking.

The evidence is now sadly familiar to anyone who follows these cases: South Carolina today mistreats these ill people without any evident traces of remorse.  Even though there are few disputed material issues of law or fact in the case, even though the judge implored the state to take responsibility for its conduct, South Carolina declared before the sun had set Wednesday that it would appeal the ruling—and thus likely doom the inmates to years more abuse and neglect. That’s not just “deliberate indifference,” the applicable legal standard in these prison abuse cases. That is immoral.

Read more. [Image: SCDC/Trial Exhibit]

208 Notes

nprmusic:

Poet, author and music writer Amiri Baraka has died. Here’s Eugene Holley Jr. on Baraka’s massively influential Blues People in July 2013. 

2 Notes

The Outrider Podcast: Episode 8: Colin Dickey

quinn09shadow:

In this episode, I talk with Colin Dickey about writing quaintly transgressive fiction, the dilemma of the literary critic in the modern, make-nice world, his trip to the arctic, and giving up on famous writers’ books.

Colin is the author of two delightful, and quirky books (neither of which I…

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