Tangentia Encyclopedia Avatar

55 Notes

gettyimages:

On This Day 20 Years Ago | Jeff Buckey’s iconic ‘Grace’ album was released.

We take a look back at the incredibly talented and influential Jeff Buckley.

gettyimages:

On This Day 20 Years Ago | Jeff Buckey’s iconic ‘Grace’ album was released.

We take a look back at the incredibly talented and influential Jeff Buckley.

2 Notes

The Outrider Podcast: Episode 20: Pauls Toutonghi

quinn09shadow:

In this episode I talk with the wonderful Pauls Toutonghi about sleeping babies, family vacations, growing up in Seattle, Michael Ondaatje, getting sober, and what kids do at Latvian summer camp.

Pauls is the author of two novels, Red Weather and Evel Knievel Days. Pauls’ fiction and essays…

6007 Notes

guardian:

Tommy Ramone, the last original member from influential band, has died aged 62. 

The band, founded in New York in 1974, had a major influence on punk rock. Tommy Ramone was the last surviving member of its original lineup. He had reportedly been undergoing treatment for cancer. 
• RIP Tommy Ramone: your band captured the sound in my head
Photo: Alamy

guardian:

Tommy Ramone, the last original member from influential band, has died aged 62. 

The band, founded in New York in 1974, had a major influence on punk rock. Tommy Ramone was the last surviving member of its original lineup. He had reportedly been undergoing treatment for cancer. 

• RIP Tommy Ramone: your band captured the sound in my head

Photo: Alamy

212 Notes

The New Testament never — not one time — applies the “Christian” label to a business or even a government. The tag is applied only to individuals. If the Bible is your ultimate guide, the only organization one might rightly term “Christian” is a church. And this is only because a church in the New Testament is not a building or a business, but a collection of Christian individuals who have repented, believed on Christ, and are pursuing a life of holiness. Journalists or cultural commentators might use the phrase “Christian business” in colloquial or cultural terms, but conservative evangelicals must admit that the term makes no theological sense for them given their views of salvation, sanctification, and revelation.
Jonathan Merritt. ht: The Daily Dish (via politicalprof)

43155 Notes

emilianadarling:

bailarina-raven:

“I don’t want people to like her anymore, almost, that sounds really, really bad.I want people to realize that actually she’s not the same anymore. You can’t root for her forever, because she’s not there to be your favorite character. That’s not what she’s there for. She’s real. People go down bad paths and they make bad decisions, but it’s always justified in their head. I want the audience to differentiate that and not just be like, ‘Oh, it’s Arya, we love her.’ Because actually look at what Arya’s doing. She’s being eaten away from the inside out, and she’s not stopping it.” - about Arya

#A GAME OF CHILD ACTORS WHO REALLY KNOW THEIR FUCKING CHARACTERS

emilianadarling:

bailarina-raven:

“I don’t want people to like her anymore, almost, that sounds really, really bad.I want people to realize that actually she’s not the same anymore. You can’t root for her forever, because she’s not there to be your favorite character. That’s not what she’s there for. She’s real. People go down bad paths and they make bad decisions, but it’s always justified in their head. I want the audience to differentiate that and not just be like, ‘Oh, it’s Arya, we love her.’ Because actually look at what Arya’s doing. She’s being eaten away from the inside out, and she’s not stopping it.” - about Arya

#A GAME OF CHILD ACTORS WHO REALLY KNOW THEIR FUCKING CHARACTERS

680 Notes

fotojournalismus:

Stuart Franklin, Tank Man of Tiananmen, Tiananmen Square, Beijing, 4th June 1989.

"It was odd: at the beginning, the Tiananmen Square demonstrations had an upbeat, almost rock festival feel. But then as the army moved in, it turned ugly. So the following morning, I was on the balcony in my hotel room on Chang’an Avenue in Beijing, about 150 metres from Tiananmen Square. I couldn’t leave the hotel, as Chinese security had occupied the lobby. It was a bit frustrating: having grown up with the Magnum ethos that if a picture isn’t good enough, you’re not close enough, I found myself looking on with quite a long lens.
I remember seeing a row of soldiers and a row of students facing each other at the entrance to the square. Then the tanks rolled forward, and this guy jumped out of the crowd and just did this whole dance in front of them. He jumped on and off the tank, and I was just photographing away.
To be honest, I was thinking that this wasn’t terribly interesting. But this guy from Vanity Fair was saying it was an iconic moment - a moment that history would remember. And I was going, “Really?” I didn’t get it. Photographically, it didn’t seem terribly interesting: the guy was really small. But I do think there is an energy to it - there is smoke coming out of one tank, as if they’re revving up to run him over. I saw two or three people in civilian clothes scoop him up and take him back into the crowd, which swallowed him up. He has not been seen or heard of since.
It was only after speaking to the Magnum office in Paris a couple of days later that I realised how important it was. They were saying: “This is amazing! You’ve got the tank man!” It’s always nice when you’re in the field and the office sound happy, which is rare.
Then Time magazine ran it big, and Life magazine ran it as a double page. It became an Amnesty International poster, up on every student wall. I was proud that it became so important to people. I’m not the only person who photographed the scene, so I wouldn’t say that mine was unique. But I’m not at all bored of talking about it.” 
- Stuart Franklin/Magnum, May 2009. (via Guardian)

Stuart Franklin’s film was smuggled out in a packet of tea by a French student and delivered to the Magnum office in Paris.
Also: There was not just one “tank man” photo. Four photographers (Charlie Cole, Arthur Tsang Hin Wah, Jeff Widener, Stuart Franklin) captured the encounter that day from the Beijing Hotel, overlooking Changan Avenue.

fotojournalismus:

Stuart Franklin, Tank Man of TiananmenTiananmen Square, Beijing, 4th June 1989.

"It was odd: at the beginning, the Tiananmen Square demonstrations had an upbeat, almost rock festival feel. But then as the army moved in, it turned ugly. So the following morning, I was on the balcony in my hotel room on Chang’an Avenue in Beijing, about 150 metres from Tiananmen Square. I couldn’t leave the hotel, as Chinese security had occupied the lobby. It was a bit frustrating: having grown up with the Magnum ethos that if a picture isn’t good enough, you’re not close enough, I found myself looking on with quite a long lens.

I remember seeing a row of soldiers and a row of students facing each other at the entrance to the square. Then the tanks rolled forward, and this guy jumped out of the crowd and just did this whole dance in front of them. He jumped on and off the tank, and I was just photographing away.

To be honest, I was thinking that this wasn’t terribly interesting. But this guy from Vanity Fair was saying it was an iconic moment - a moment that history would remember. And I was going, “Really?” I didn’t get it. Photographically, it didn’t seem terribly interesting: the guy was really small. But I do think there is an energy to it - there is smoke coming out of one tank, as if they’re revving up to run him over. I saw two or three people in civilian clothes scoop him up and take him back into the crowd, which swallowed him up. He has not been seen or heard of since.

It was only after speaking to the Magnum office in Paris a couple of days later that I realised how important it was. They were saying: “This is amazing! You’ve got the tank man!” It’s always nice when you’re in the field and the office sound happy, which is rare.

Then Time magazine ran it big, and Life magazine ran it as a double page. It became an Amnesty International poster, up on every student wall. I was proud that it became so important to people. I’m not the only person who photographed the scene, so I wouldn’t say that mine was unique. But I’m not at all bored of talking about it.” 

- Stuart Franklin/Magnum, May 2009. (via Guardian)

Stuart Franklin’s film was smuggled out in a packet of tea by a French student and delivered to the Magnum office in Paris.

Also: There was not just one “tank man” photo. Four photographers (Charlie Cole, Arthur Tsang Hin Wah, Jeff Widener, Stuart Franklin) captured the encounter that day from the Beijing Hotel, overlooking Changan Avenue.

3212 Notes

penamerican:

"I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”

RIP Maya Angleou, 1928-2014

penamerican:

"I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”

RIP Maya Angleou, 1928-2014

3487 Notes

There’s not one Internet for deep-pocketed corporations and a separate Internet for everyone else — there’s the Internet, and it belongs to all of us. That’s the way it’s always been. And that’s the way it should continue to be.
 
But the FCC could change all of that by giving big Internet providers — corporations like Comcast, Time Warner Cable, AT&T, and Verizon — the power to pick and choose which traffic reaches consumers quickly—and which doesn’t.
 
Net neutrality has made the Internet a platform for innovation and economic growth. For example, YouTube started as a relatively small outfit above a pizzeria in a strip mall. YouTube wanted to compete with Google, which had an online video product called Google Video (later Google Videos). Net neutrality guaranteed that YouTube’s and Google’s videos would travel to consumers at the same speeds. Google wasn’t able to pay for a fast lane or any other unfair advantage. Even though Google was a bigger, wealthier, more established company, it had to compete with YouTube on a level playing field. And YouTube ultimately won because it offered a better product.
 
That’s what net neutrality is all about. There’s not one Internet for deep-pocketed corporations and a separate Internet for everyone else — there’s the Internet, and it belongs to all of us. That’s the way it’s always been. And that’s the way it should continue to be.
There aren’t many places left where every American can participate on an equal footing with deep-pocketed corporate interests. Our campaign finance laws are in shambles, giving uber-wealthy, often-anonymous groups free rein to amplify their voices over those of the general population. Our tax code is littered with special benefits for special interests. The rules of our civil justice system have been rewritten to insulate corporations from wrongdoing against workers and consumers. But the Internet remains an arena where the quality of one’s products, the value of one’s services, and the persuasiveness of one’s ideas matter more than the depth of one’s pockets. The FCC needs to keep it that way.

21 Notes

Robert Capa’s Longest Day

the-feature:

Seventy years ago, the great war photographer joined the first slaughterhouse wave of D-day, recording WW II’s pivotal battle in 11 historic images of blur and grit. But that is only a fraction compared with what he shot — and lost.

38301 Notes

humansofnewyork:

"Saddest moment? How am I supposed to choose between losing my parents and seeing my friends die in Vietnam? I don’t categorize those things. Listen, a person is like a rubber band ball. We’ve all got a lot of bad rubber bands, and a lot of good rubber bands, and they’re all wrapped up together. And you’ve got to have both types of bands or your rubber band ball ain’t gonna bounce. And no use trying to untangle them. You know what I’m saying?"

humansofnewyork:

"Saddest moment? How am I supposed to choose between losing my parents and seeing my friends die in Vietnam? I don’t categorize those things. Listen, a person is like a rubber band ball. We’ve all got a lot of bad rubber bands, and a lot of good rubber bands, and they’re all wrapped up together. And you’ve got to have both types of bands or your rubber band ball ain’t gonna bounce. And no use trying to untangle them. You know what I’m saying?"

266 Notes

When people like Cliven Bundy assert the primacy of the past it is important that we do not recount it selectively. American enslavement is the destruction of the black body for profit. That is the past that Cliven Bundy believes “the Negro” to have been better off in. He is, regrettably, not alone.

5223 Notes

Until you’re about the age of twenty, you read everything, and you like it simply because you are reading it. Then between twenty and thirty you pick what you want, and you read the best, you read all the great works. After that you sit and wait for them to be written. But you know, the least known, the least famous writers, they are the better ones.

308 Notes

Five Ways To Be A Better Poptimist

nprmusic:

1. Don’t insist that pop be hip. A good chunk of mainstream music gains inspiration from more cutting-edge stuff — always has. (Remember when The Monkees went psychedelic?) But plenty of it plays by other rules: It could be rooted in Christian contemporary music, emo, or soft rock. That…

145 Notes

gettyimagesarchive:

Picture Post photographer THURSTON HOPKINS is 101 today!

HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

CLICK HERE to read a piece written by our curator Sarah McDonald (@PhotoFramed) for Hopkins’ 100th birthday last year.

CLICK HERE to see more photos from the photojournalist The Guardian called one of the greatest of the 20th century. 

From the top:

Picture Post Photographer Thurston Hopkins in Tonga, 26th December 1953. Hopkins is sitting under a home-made sign reading ‘Picture Post South Seas Office, Tonga’. Picture Post - 6832 - Report From Tonga - pub. 1953 

12th February 1955: A young couple getting to know each other at the Manchester University Student Union Fresher’s Ball.

A parade of lifeguards from the Life-Saving Clubs of Sydney at the Surf Carnival during the Royal tour of Australia and New Zealand, 23rd January 1954. Picture Post - 6832 - Royal Tour:The Empire’s Finest Life Saver - pub. 1954 

June 1956: A busy street in Madrid reflected in a shop window. Original Publication: Picture Post - 8493 - Madrid - unpub.

 

20124 Notes

humansofnewyork:

"You want to photograph me eating chicken?""Yep.""Well, if I let you, I need you to help me deliver a message.""What’s that?""I work at this library. And before that, I was coming here for twenty years. It’s my favorite place in the world. As many people know, the main reading room of this library is supported by seven floors of books, which contain one of the greatest research collections in the world. Recently, the library administration has decided to rip out this collection, send the books to New Jersey, and use the space for a lending library. As part of the consolidation, they are going to close down the Mid-Manhattan Library Branch as well as the Science, Industry, and Business Library. When everything is finished, one of the greatest research libraries in the world will become a glorified internet cafe. Now read that back to me."

humansofnewyork:

"You want to photograph me eating chicken?"
"Yep."
"Well, if I let you, I need you to help me deliver a message."
"What’s that?"
"I work at this library. And before that, I was coming here for twenty years. It’s my favorite place in the world. As many people know, the main reading room of this library is supported by seven floors of books, which contain one of the greatest research collections in the world. Recently, the library administration has decided to rip out this collection, send the books to New Jersey, and use the space for a lending library. As part of the consolidation, they are going to close down the Mid-Manhattan Library Branch as well as the Science, Industry, and Business Library. When everything is finished, one of the greatest research libraries in the world will become a glorified internet cafe. Now read that back to me."

Likes

Following